<div dir="ltr"><div><div><div>Hi Ron,<br></div>You say, "Without a suitable set of standards/guidelines this is very<br>
difficult to do and it is very hard for a commercial provider to shoot for a<br>
moving target." <br></div>What do you mean? Why isn't WCAG 2.0 a suitable set of standards? Will the ADA changes address publisher content? <br></div><div>Thanks,<br>Karen<br><br></div><div><div><div><div><div><div dir="ltr">

<span style="font-family:trebuchet ms,sans-serif">Karen M. Sorensen</span><span style="font-family:trebuchet ms,sans-serif"></span><br style="font-family:trebuchet ms,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:trebuchet ms,sans-serif">Accessibility Advocate for Online Courses</span><br>

<a href="http://www.pcc.edu/access" target="_blank">www.pcc.edu/access</a><br style="font-family:trebuchet ms,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:trebuchet ms,sans-serif">Portland Community College</span><br style="font-family:trebuchet ms,sans-serif">

<span style="font-family:trebuchet ms,sans-serif">
971-722-4720</span><br><span style="line-height:115%;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";font-size:11pt"><font color="#000000"><i>"The power of the Web is in its universality. Access
by everyone regardless of disability is an essential aspect.</i><span> </span>Tim Berners-Lee</font></span><br><span style="color:rgb(0,0,0);text-transform:none;text-indent:0px;letter-spacing:normal;word-spacing:0px;white-space:normal;border-collapse:separate"><span style="color:rgb(51,51,51);line-height:19px;font-family:Arial,Verdana,sans-serif;font-size:14px"></span></span><br>

</div></div>
</div></div></div></div></div>